Cumberbatch Counts UK 1881

Cumberbatchs in England, 1881 & 2001

Cumberbatch is a surname based on a place called Comberbach which is a small village in Cheshire, England. These maps show the distribution of the surname by 1881.

By Bob Cumberbatch www.cumberbatch.org




















Cumberbatch Counts UK 1881Surname Frequency UK 1881

The numbers in the map show the counts of Cumberbatchs in England in 1881, and the redder the county the more there are. 154 in Staffordshire, 119 in Lancashire and 108 in Northamptonshire.

The highest number of Cumberbatchs were to be found in:
  • Staffordshire
  • Lancashire
  • Northamptonshire
  • Cheshire

As Comberbach in Cheshire is the origin of the surname, then the picture above shows migration away from Cheshire and into neighbouring counties. This suggests that the migration away from the area began many years prior to 1881.

Tudor tax returns of 1545-46 for Congleton tax the three most wealthy local men at a rate of:
  • Richard Grene, several times mayor, £35 / yr
  • James Rode (Rood), £21 / yr
  • Thomas Comberbach, £20 / yr
  • Cheshire

These three men were the only Congleton men to have voluntarily contributed to the King's collection in the next year (History of Congleton, Ed. WB Stephens p.49). Congleton is 18.8 miles away from Comberbach. Migration away from Comberbach may have started during the 16th century.

Conclusion

The high county population in Lancashire effectively masks the 2nd highest number of instances of the surname Cumberbatch, whilst the low population of Huntingdonshire effectively promotes the 10 individuals in that small county. This distribution is too late to help to pinpoint the origin of this surname.


Surname Density UK 1881

Cumberbatch Surname Distribution Map - 1881

The numbers of Cumberbatchs in the map shows how densely populated the surname Cumberbatch is in the highlighted counties of England. The density of a surname aims shows how concentrated the surname is, in any one location at that time, compared to the national average. A density equal to '1' indicates an even distribution, i.e. equivalent to the national average. A density greater than '1' indicates a higher, than normal, concentration of the surname. This could indicate the place of origin of the surname, or just a more fertile bunch of families.
For instance, there are 18 times more CUMBERBATCHs, well CUMBERPATCHs, in Northamptonshire than the national average population there. These are mostly CUMBERPATCHs, see below. 7 times for Staffordshire and 5 times for Cheshire.

The density of Cumberbatchs suggest a prolific concentration in:
  • Northamptonshire
  • Huntingdonshire
  • Staffordshire
  • Cheshire

Northamptonshire : 108 - 17 times the national average : the seat of Cumberpatch = 97.2%

  • 103 CUMBERPATCH
  • 2 CUMBERLEGE
  • 1 CUMBERLIDGE
  • 1 CUMBERPACH
  • 1 CUMPERPATCH
Most were born there

Huntindonshire : 10

  • 1 family of 8 CUMBLIDGE
  • 2 CUMBLEDGE
All were born in Huntingdonshire. A 'large' concentration in a small county - misleading



Staffordshire 154 - 7 times the national average

  • 27 CUMBERBIRCH
  • 26 CUMBERLIDGE
  • 23 CUMBERBATCH
  • 19 COMBERBACH
  • 9 CUMBERBACH
  • Other variants

Cheshire 66 - 4 times the national average

  • 27 CUMBERBIRCH
  • 15 COMBERBACH
  • 15 CUMBERBATCH
  • 6 CUMBERLIDGE
  • Other variants

1881 Surname variants

  • CUMBERLIDGE 146
  • CUMBERBATCH 114
  • CUMBERPATCH 109
  • CUMBERBIRCH 65
  • CUMBERLEDGE 46
  • COMBERBACH 45
  • CUMBERBACH 25
  • CUMBERBEACH 22
  • CUMBLIDGE 19
  • CUMBERLEGE 18
  • CAMBERLIDGE 14
  • CUMBERLIGE 6
  • COMBERBASH 3
  • CUMBERBACK 3
  • CUMBERBATH 3
  • CUMBERLATCH 3
  • CUMBERLODGE 3
  • CUMERLIDGE 3
  • COMBERLEGE 2
  • CUMBERFATCH 2
  • CUMBLEDGE 2
  • CAMBERBATCH 1
  • CAMBERLEDGE 1
  • COMBERBACK 1
  • COMBERBEACH 1
  • CUMBERL 1
  • CUMBERLAGE 1
  • CUMBERLITCH 1
  • CUMBERPACH 1
  • CUMBERTH 1
  • CUMPERPATCH 1
  • Total 663

Surname Density UK 2001

Cumberbatch Density UK 2001

By 2001 little has changed. Stoke on Trent in Staffordshire has 10 times the national average. Daventry in Northamptonshire has 8 times and parts of Lancashire and Cheshire have 7 times.

Inner London was treated separately as London has a large population. As David Hey in his Family Names and Family History p.140 explains: "Commonwealth immigrants who have arrived since the 1950s can be even more difficult to identify in this way [distribution by telephone numbers], for many came with English surnames. Some of the bearers of distinctive surnames derived from English villages and hamlets turn out to be descendants of African slaves who were shipped to the West Indies and given the name of a slave owner whose family originated in England. For example, Comberbatch (sic) [he means Cumberbatch], a surname which is derived from a village in Cheshire, is a very common name in Barbados and has been reintroduced into England by West Indian immigrants.....As immigrants tend to cluster together, some of their distinctive surnames are now confined to particular localities in Britain."

Whilst slave naming patterns are not the subject here he does raise a point regarding immigrants. The UK National Archives website 'Moving Here' includes a sample of immigrants ariving at UK ports between 1950 and 1960. In this sample 43 Cumberbatchs are mentioned and 33 (77%) are destined for London. The 'clustering' Hey mentions may be identified in the above mentioned Inner London boroughs, which may well be due to immigrants from Barbados. 'Moving Here' explains why and how:
"A minority [of Caribbeans] were recruited and subsidised by London Transport or by the hospitals of the new Health Service, but the majority came of their own accord, paying fares of up to £85, for ship cabins they typically shared with half a dozen other travellers. At the lower price range, conditions were worse, and cabin accommodation could be shared among a score of passengers."